The Real Story of Friday the 13th

The number 13 has always had the reputation of being bad luck, but it has inspired late 19th-century secret society, a novel and a horror film franchise. It also gave us two unwieldy terms—paraskavedekatriaphobia and friggatriskaidekaphobia. Today Lets dive into what makes Friday the 13th bad luck!

The Fear of 13

Just like crossing paths with a black cat, walking under a ladder or breaking a mirror, many people believe that Friday the 13th brings bad luck. It’s uncertain when this particular tradition began, the harmful superstitions have surrounded 13 for centuries. In western cultures have historically associated the number 12 with completeness, For example, 12 months in a year, 12 days of Christmas, and 12 gods of Olympus. But 13 has a long history of bad luck. Fear of the number 13 has even earned a psychological term triskaidekaphobia.

Why is Friday the 13th Unlucky?

The biblical tradition says, 13 guests attended the last supper. Jesus and his 12 apostles. (one who was Judas who was know to betrayed him.) The next day would be a good Friday, which would be the day of Jesus’ crucifixion. The seating arrangement was to believe in having given the longstanding superstition that 13 guests at the table were a bad omen.

Friday the 13th in Pop Culture

The number 13 may have a bad reputation, but in 1907, an important milestone happened. Thomas William Lawson’s novel Friday the Thirteenth was published. The story takes place in New York. A stockbroker who plays on superstitions about the date to make chaos on wall street and make a killing on the market 

The horror movie Friday, the 13th, released in 1980, introduced the world to a hockey mask-wearing killer named Jason and is perhaps the best-known example of the famous superstition in pop culture history. The movie spawned multiple sequels, as well as comic books, video games, related merchandise, and countless terrifying Halloween costumes. You can’t go anywhere without seeing the Jason mask! I really love the movies and the franchise as a whole. 

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